Obstetrics






“Obstetric anaesthesia and analgesia is the only area of anaesthetic practice where two patients are cared for simultaneously. Pregnancy is a physiological rather than a pathological state. Patient expectations are high and the mother expects full involvement in her choices of care. The majority of the workload is the provision of analgesia in labour and anaesthesia for delivery. Multidisciplinary care for the sick mother is increasingly important and highlighted”.

Obstetrics

  1. Basic knowledge of obstetrics
  2. Management of twin pregnancy
  3. Management of premature delivery
  4. Assessment of fetal well being in utero
  5. Maternal morbidity and mortality
  6. Legal aspects related to fetus
  7. Physiology of “abnormal pregnancy”
  8. Optimisation for the ‘at risk’ baby
  9. Hypertension in pregnancy
  10. Feeding / starvation policies
  11. Thromboprophylaxis

Obstetric analgesia

  1. Pain pathways relevant to labour
  2. Methods of analgesia during labour : indications and contraindications
  3. Epidural / subarachnoid analgesia for labour
    1. Management of complications of regional block and of failure to achieve adequate block
    2. Epidural and subarachnoid anaesthesia for Caesarean Section, and other operative deliveries
    3. Conversion of analgesia for labour to that for operative delivery
    4. Management of accidental dural puncture and post-dural puncture headache

Obstetric anaesthesia

  1. Principles of anaesthesia for incidental surgery during pregnancy
    1. Anaesthetic drugs and pregnancy
  2. Preoperative assessment of pregnant patient
  3. Effect of pregnancy on the technique of general and regional anaesthesia
  4. Influence of common concurrent medical diseases
  5. Acid aspiration prophylaxis
  6. Intubation problems in the full-term mother
  7. Anaesthesia for retained products of conception
  8. Anaesthesia/analgesia for instrumental delivery
  9. Anaesthesia for retained placenta
  10. Anaesthesia for caesarean section
  11. Management of dilutional coagulopathy
  12. High dependency care of obstetric patients
  13. Emergencies in obstetric anaesthesia:
    1. Pre-eclampsia, eclampsia
    2. Failed intubation
    3. Major haemorrhage, APH and PPH
    4. Maternal resuscitation
    5. Amniotic fluid embolus
    6. Total spinal

CEACCP 2005: FEBRUARY
Caroline Fortescue and Michael YK Wee
Analgesia in labour: non-regional techniques

CEACCP 2004: AUGUST
Elizabeth McGrady and Kerry Litchfield
Epidural analgesia in labour

CEACCP 2003: AUGUST
Helen Brooks and Anne May
Neurological complications following regional anaesthesia in obstetrics

CEACCP 2001: JUNE
Paul Sharpe
Accidental dural puncture in obstetrics

CEACCP 2006: APRIL
Nina Kylie Dorothy Walton and Venkata Krishnaker Melachuri
Anaesthesia for non-obstetric surgery during pregnancy

CEACCP 2004: JUNE
Satya Francis and Anne May
Pregnant women with significant medical conditions: anaesthetic implications

CEACCP 2001: DECEMBER
David M Levy
Anaesthesia for Caesarean section

CEACCP 2002: DECEMBER
Claire Thomas and Tamara Madej
Obstetric emergencies and the anaesthetist

CEACCP 2003: APRIL
Elaine Hart and Sue Coley
The diagnosis and management of pre-eclampsia

CEACCP 2001: AUGUST
S Morris
Management of difficult and failed intubation in obstetrics

CEACCP 2005: DECEMBER
Amelia Banks and Andrew Norris
Massive haemorrhage in pregnancy